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Shared by Mia Zimman

A Dulce de Leche Hamantaschen Recipe for the Next Generation

A Dulce de Leche Hamantaschen Recipe for the Next Generation

Family Journey

Petaluma, California
1 recipes
Hamantaschen With Dulce de Leche Filling

Hamantaschen With Dulce de Leche Filling

About 30 cookies25 min active + 3 h and 45 min inactive

Ingredients

For the dough

  • 2 ½ cups + 3 teaspoons all-purpose flour
  • ½ cup + 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 1 ½ teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • ⅔ cup butter room temperature
  • ¾ cup granulated sugar
  • 2 large eggs room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Zest of 1 lemon

For the dulce de leche filling

  • 1 - 14 ounce can sweetened condensed milk
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

For garnish

  • 1 cup unsweetened shredded coconut 
Recipes
1
Hamantaschen With Dulce de Leche Filling

Hamantaschen With Dulce de Leche Filling

About 30 cookies25 min active + 3 h and 45 min inactive

Ingredients

For the dough

  • 2 ½ cups + 3 teaspoons all-purpose flour
  • ½ cup + 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 1 ½ teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • ⅔ cup butter room temperature
  • ¾ cup granulated sugar
  • 2 large eggs room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Zest of 1 lemon

For the dulce de leche filling

  • 1 - 14 ounce can sweetened condensed milk
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

For garnish

  • 1 cup unsweetened shredded coconut 

As Mia Zimman prepares to celebrate Purim this year with her daughter Luna and husband Alejandro, she will fold delicate hamantaschen dough into a triangle around dulce de leche. The caramel-like spread has been a part of Alejandro’s family table for over 100 years. 

In the early 1900s, around the time of the Russo-Japanese war, his great-grandparents left Ukraine. There were two boats departing, one for New York and the other for Buenos Aires, explains Mia. By chance, they boarded the boat for Argentina where they joined a fast-growing Jewish community.

Two generations later, with growing political unrest in Argentina and a coup in 1976, half of Alejandro’s family moved to Madrid. He was little when they arrived in Spain, but still remembers relatives coming to visit with a tin of dulce de leche in their suitcases. “They would always have family meetings together and talk for hours,” Mia explains, and snack on pastries like alfajores, a signature sandwich cookie from South America made with dulce de leche. 

The cookies have remained an important part of Alejandro’s family life. In California where he and Mia now live with their two-year-old daughter, the cookies are served at every family gathering and birthday celebration. Last Purim, Mia, who grew up in an Ashkenazi American home, decided to create a new tradition for family, tucking dulce de leche into hamantaschen and adding cornstarch to the dough to give it the crumbly texture of alfajores. The recipe, she says, brings together their daughter’s identities. “She’s Latina, Jewish, American — she’s got so many cultural identities,” Mia notes. “It just feels really good to put together a few different pieces into one.”